I don't understand rusticated pipes

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danielplainview

Preferred Member
Mar 30, 2014
2,858
13
wv
At first I wasn't a huge fan of rustic and blasts, I prefer them now. You can't argue with the beauty of a nicely grained smooth finish, but I love the feel of a rustic or blast in my hand as I read a book.

@ Peck. If you see this, please post a picture of one of your Parks rustic pipes or a Cannoy blast.

When you see those babies, you will repent.

 

dread

Preferred Member
Jun 19, 2013
1,619
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I too used to prefer smooth pipes, but I started appreciating rusticated pipes for their dissipation of heat, then one day I just woke up and preferred them and sandblasts to smooth. Don't get me wrong, I truly love a well grained smooth, but the vast majority of the pipes I buy are rusticated or blasted. I also really like the tactile feel in the hand.

 

phred

Preferred Member
Dec 11, 2012
1,755
0
I just bought my first rusticated pipe, as my local B&M just happened to have a Rossi Vittoria in the 8320 Author shape, which is rapidly becoming a favorite of mine. The rustication does add a tactile dimension to the pipe smoking experience. I'm still a fan of smooth pipes with nice grain, but rustication's kind of grown on me.

 

lestrout

Preferred Member
Jan 28, 2010
1,639
5
Chester County, PA
I too started off liking only smooths. But that was before I set eyes on Rad Davis's signature Radesian, with a smooth top. And as luck would have it, that beauty fell into my hands and is one of my best puffers, the proverbial Magic Pipe.
hp

les

 

phil67

Preferred Member
Dec 14, 2013
2,052
1
Don't get me wrong as I love a well executed rusticated pipe, but this idea that it disperses heat is utter BS in my opinion. Rusticating a pipe was intended for two reasons. The obvious one would be to hide flaws in a particular block of briar which happens all too often and does not in any way take away from it being a good quality smoker. The other reason is that the maker (I'm referring to handmade pipes here) can do fantastic artistic rusticating, or sandblasting, and does not necessarily mean that the briar does not have a high quality of good tight grain. Rusticating was in no way shape or form intended as a means of 'dispersing' heat. A deep rustication might very well feel good (cooler) in the hand, but that does not mean that the heat is not building up in the wall of the bowl any less than a smooth bowl.

 

mikestanley

Preferred Member
May 10, 2009
1,330
36
Akron area of Ohio
Rustication hides not only flaws, which can happen on a very nicely grained block but also bald spots where there isn't any grain. Well done rustication is an art, badly done it can be a real hack job.
Mike S.

 

dread

Preferred Member
Jun 19, 2013
1,619
0
@ Phil, I don't think we are saying different things. I mean, when I say "dissipates", that it cools off faster to my hand. That doesn't speak at all to what is happening where it counts on the chamber wall. You can't jus puff away like a train and expect it to save you.

 

zekest

Preferred Member
Apr 1, 2013
1,137
1
Some don't understand rustication.
I don't understand shapes like the blow fish and reverse calabash.

 

phil67

Preferred Member
Dec 14, 2013
2,052
1
@ Phil, I don't think we are saying different things. I mean, when I say "dissipates", that it cools off faster to my hand. That doesn't speak at all to what is happening where it counts on the chamber wall. You can't jus puff away like a train and expect it to save you.
Yep, true and exactly what I was alluding to and it would seem as though we're on the same boat on that then. :wink:

 

phil67

Preferred Member
Dec 14, 2013
2,052
1
Some don't understand rustication.
I don't understand shapes like the blow fish and reverse calabash.
One doesn't have anything to do with the other. Blow fish and reverse calabash shapes are exactly that... shapes. Personally, I don't care care for the calabash shape, but I somewhat like the blow fish shape. But, that all amounts to nothing more than ones personal taste and nothing more be they rusticated, sandblast or smooth.

 

chasingembers

Preferred Member
Nov 12, 2014
16,807
2,351
Bruce Weaver sandblast tulip with ivory shank accent and cumberland stem. Check out that ring grain! I liked smooth finishes and pretty grain when I was younger, but now, the larger, more rugged pipes are the way to go for me.


 

meatballj

Member
Jan 14, 2014
122
2
New Brunswick
I think I get the concept of sandblasting much better now from this last photo and the conversation. As I can see it, the blast brings a textured feel to the inherent grain of the wood as opposed to an imposed pattern through a rusticated finish.
Been thinking about this post a lot and I like rusticated pipes for two reasons; 1)Rusticated pipes are much more forgiving of everyday wear and tear, and 2)My rusticated pipes (Peterson Donegal & a Savinelli System) both smoke extremely well. Presumably because of some of that heat dissipation discussed earlier.

 

lochinvar

Preferred Member
Oct 22, 2013
1,335
112
A good rustication like Castello Sea Rock is a beautiful thing, a lot of thought and skill goes into their process. There are many where little thought goes in and it shows. Castello, Ser Jacopo, Rinaldo and Ferndown do great rustications. I prefer sandblasted to rusticated if there is interesting enough grain to work with, but I prefer both to smooth.

 

iamn8

Preferred Member
Sep 8, 2014
4,253
1
Moody, AL
@ Kane...... Thank you! Id been seeing photos of his work and I've never seen blasting like Cookes. He has a fascinating backstory as well which makes a big difference to me. I went from being strictly a Dunhill collector to being a Cooke fan. If you ever have the opportunity to handle one do! They are far more stunning in person!

 

darwin

Preferred Member
Apr 9, 2014
821
0
There is only one carver, so far as I'm aware, that can get away with blasting a flaw free stummel and that is one Mr. Walt Cannoy. His "suede" blasts are as intolerant of briar flaws as a smooth but that's because his blast is so extremely delicate and fine. Dunno how he does it but I haven't noticed the technique being used by others and I'm guessing that's because it is a major pain in the tookus to properly accomplish.

 

buroak

Preferred Member
Jul 29, 2014
1,858
0
As with several other contributors here I did not at first like sandblasted or rusticated pipes. As I gained more experience with pipes, though, I learned to appreciate not only the cool-smoking characteristics of a blasted/rusticated pipe, but also the beauty of their appearance.

 

hierophant

Preferred Member
Jul 27, 2014
1,852
1
I prefer rusticated or blasted finishes over smooth myself, but aesthetics of course are personal. I guess rustication or blasting can be used to hide flaws, but that isn't necessarily why it's being done. And even if it is, which would you rather see, a sandblasted finish or a smooth finish with a bunch of fills?

 

jorgesoler

Senior Member
Dec 3, 2014
356
0
I personally prefer smooth finishes over the rusticated ones, but I must admit to the fact some sandblasted pipes are just as beautiful. I guess it all depends who is making the rustication or sandblasting and the reason behind it. It is true that some rustications will hide some flaws or imperfections in pipes that should've been rejected, but this is not always the case.

 

peckinpahhombre

Preferred Member
Dec 24, 2012
7,117
48
I agree with everything said on here. Here are some blasts from my collection which show that the process only accentuates the true grain of the pipe, rather than hiding it.
Roush:

Cooke:

Michael Parks billiard and Canadian set:

While I tend to prefer blasted over rusticated pipes, I do love the Castello Sea Rock series. The Italians know how to properly rusticate a pipe, in my view, and still make it look natural, as in this example.


 

thebadkitty

Member
Feb 29, 2012
271
0
Albany, Oregon
Wow Peck, just effin' wow. In the stem of the Roush I see ocean waves and night time sky (no fairy farts though).

Thank you for showing us, and please don't ever stop.

 
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