Could this be the last corncob I need to buy? (80s? freehand)

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jchaplick

Preferred Member
May 8, 2011
1,702
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So this is goingto be different than what you may think. I've been smoking for a while now, been a while since I posted, glad to be back.
Ok back to the corncob pipe. I've owned a few of them, and many brobroadsut I've never seen any corn cob pipe like this one. I believe it's from the late 80s, but I'm not sure. The piece of corn it's made out of is giant. Here are some pictures of it compared to a current year freehand. I doubt this giant will ever burn out. I would really like to hear everyone's options on it.
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If anyone wants other pictures as well let me know.

 

jchaplick

Preferred Member
May 8, 2011
1,702
2
Sorry about that. Haven't used photobucket or this forum on my new phone. Copied the wrong link.

 

brass

Preferred Member
Jun 4, 2014
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United States
I've owned three MM Freehands thus far, with a custom Freehand from Riccardo-Santia on the way and must say I haven't seen one with kernels that large.
But I doubt MM has consciously decided to downsize the size of cobs used. My guess is that the size depends on the cob vintage, the suppliers and a lucky draw from the lot.
Sun, water and pestilence and other factors will produce variations in crops from year to year, both in quantity and quality. So it is quite possible that the average cob from one year will be larger or smaller compared to the cobs from another year.
I also suspect MM uses different suppliers and they will also vary from year to year.
Finally the size of two cobs from the same line can vary within the same year. I lost a Patriot while fishing. The replacement was significantly larger than the one I lost. I don't have both to compare but I would guess the second Patriot is 20 to 30 per cent larger than my first.
One of the cool thing about cobs is that they are all one of kind.

 

jchaplick

Preferred Member
May 8, 2011
1,702
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^ I totally agree with you, side note I bought my first patriot a week ago with my first forever stem coming monday.
Definitely the actual corn vintage is the culprit, this pipe just seemed massive, the walls are close to a half inch thick! With that size I doubt I will ever burn through it

 

brass

Preferred Member
Jun 4, 2014
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These might be my last cobs. The pics are of my custom cobs from Riccardo Santia. Both are enroute, so I haven't yet smoked them.
I proposed to Kevin an article that chronicles the creation of these pipes,from concept to crafting to finishing to first smoke. If he doesn't find the proposal suitable, I'll at least post the synopsis in the pipe forum.

This was custom built just for me. I went with a modified version of an existing R. Santia design but could have chosen from numerous bowls, shank, shapes, bits and finishes.

I ordered this Freehand from existing stock. If I did it again, I might have opted for a bamboo shank.
BTW, jchaplick, you might call Marilyn and MM (Missouri Meerschaum). If it can be done, she might be able to help you date your acquisition.

 

jchaplick

Preferred Member
May 8, 2011
1,702
2
^ First off, those are beautiful and I may have to order one myself. I started on a cob but as most do switched to briar. I love it but for some reason I have just been drawn to cobs like the Death Stars tractor beam haha. Not sure what it is about them I just love them lately.
And thank you, I may shoot a message over to MM, Id like to learn about this pipe a little.

 

johnnyreb

Preferred Member
Aug 21, 2014
1,786
0
During the past few years because of the drought and the summer heat the corn doesn't grow as big and therefore the cobs run smaller in diameter and length. The length of the cob is not as important to making pipes as is the diameter of the cob. That is why MM no longer offers one of my favorites, the Great Dane Egg because the egg shape takes a much larger diameter cob. Instead they offer more spool & spindle shaped pipes that can be made from smaller diameter cobs. 2014 was a better year for the corn crop, with a wetter, cooler summer but I doubt we will see a return of some of the bigger diameter cobs based on just one season.
I doubt your Freehand can be dated other than it would predate the drought we have experienced these last few years. It was obviously made prior to the those years when larger diameter cobs were more common.

 

brass

Preferred Member
Jun 4, 2014
1,840
0
United States
Ahh, JohnyReb, I knew of vintages in general but thank you for the information on the particulars.
jchplick, take a look at these.

http://www.rsantiapipes.com/pipes-by-riccardo-santia.html
I'm already thinking I need a clencher.