Cellaring Tabac Manil La Brumeuse Semois

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kane

Senior Member
Dec 2, 2014
429
0
I am wondering how well Manil's La Burmese Semois cellars or keeps over time, or if it's best smoked fresh. Has anyone had experience with this?

I know that it comes pretty dry.

I am also wondering if it's fine to leave the tobacco in the cellophane wrapping that it comes in for long term storage, as it may not be as air tight as as a jar (sort of like the wrapping on a cigar).

Any advice on this is appreciated.
Thanks!

Cliff

 

deathmetal

Preferred Member
Jul 21, 2015
7,724
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Since the packaging was not air tight when I received the tobacco, I just broke it up and put it into jars. A year later, the contents are still quite tasty.

 

blendtobac

Preferred Member
Oct 16, 2009
1,212
23
Since it hasn't been in the US all that long, I can only speculate as to how it will age. Burleys (which would be the closest thing to Semois that I have experience with), because of their low sugar content, don't age as dramatically as Virginias, and the dryness of the tobacco would probably mean that it won't change as much without a little more moisture.

That said, time may serve to take down some of the spicy "edge", if you like some things about Semois but find it a little too sharp for your liking.
Russ

 

mso489

Preferred Member
Feb 21, 2013
25,923
97
As near as I can tell, I didn't get any cellophane with my Semois packaging, just a paper and foil rectangular wrapper, which I decided to jar as it came. Actually, I have a large jar with both the thick and medium cut versions. Since the tobacco is decidedly dry, I expect it to keep well. After nearly a year, it seems stable. Burley doesn't improve with age, in my experience, but it keeps well.

 

cossackjack

Preferred Member
Oct 31, 2014
820
4
Evergreen, Colorado
I have one block in a jar & the remainder are vacuum sealed to prevent contamination by any rogue miasmas.

Since burley-type tobaccos do not age appreciably, the vacuum sealing will not adversely affect it long-term smoking quality.

 

bigbee

Junior Member
Sep 10, 2012
58
0
Having visited Vincent a few years ago, he told me you can keep his tobacco a few( I think he said 4) years. Afterwards it looses its flavor. He laughed that I should come back each year for a new batch

 

deathmetal

Preferred Member
Jul 21, 2015
7,724
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If someone moved nearby to be near a fresh supply of Semois, I would not question their sanity.

 

kane

Senior Member
Dec 2, 2014
429
0
I would like to visit Manil myself, if and when I get out that way. What was it like?

Good info. 4 years ain't too long for the cellar.
Thanks, Gents!

Your input is appreciated.

 

bigbee

Junior Member
Sep 10, 2012
58
0
After the article in the NYTimes I visited his shop and museum. It's about 200 km from where I live.

He received us very warmly and invited us to his cellar/museum. He was curing some tobacco and at the same time packaging and cutting his product. We had the opportynity to sample some of his products, like his bouchons.After seeing a short movie about the history of the tobacco we had a chance to look around in the museum, packed with semois-, pipe- and belgian/dutch cigar industry-related items.

Afterwards we had a long discussion about how business was going (there were at the time only plans of exporting it to the US and as most of the production is manual labor he had some doubts whether he could manage to ramp up his production), the future of the Semois industry etc...

After leaving a message in his visitor's book and buying a pound of his product we left. I can recommend visiting him, not to see the fancy shiny stuff, but to see the process in real life and talk to a person who is passionate about his craft