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minfarshaw

Member
Aug 12, 2014
279
0
Currently smoking some luxury twist flake it a Brindisi I got from P&C. I hated this Tobacco the first time tried it. Plus I haven't relit in the past 40 minutes. I'm happy with this purchase. 25 bucks well spent. Don't judge a pipe by its price.

 

mso489

Preferred Member
Feb 21, 2013
26,209
408
min', I keep mentioning that, but I'm afraid it sounds like I'm dissing the magnificent artisanal and high end pipes, which isn't

the idea at all. But many of the little machine pipes cranked out for the working people are beautifully done for durability and

good smoking. About a quarter or a third of my collection are those great old pipes -- Kaywoodie, Yello-Bole, Chapuis-Comoy,

MM cob, Old Dominion cob, Iwan Ries compact, and so on. At least some of the best things in life are free, or don't cost much.

Shhhh.

 

minfarshaw

Member
Aug 12, 2014
279
0
Yeah I'm starting to learn that I have to shut my mouth on this forum. Things mentioned here end up unattainable.

 

mso489

Preferred Member
Feb 21, 2013
26,209
408
Naw. Maybe do a thread on the best pipe below ten, twenty, thirty, forty and fifty dollars. That might be interesting. Actually quite a few members

buy mostly mid- to low-level (price) pipes. The Lanes marketing man interviewed by Kevin for the magazine, Lenard Wortzel, said he was a tobacco

man but not much of a pipe man, and smoked mostly Stanwells because that is what comes over his desk, which I take to mean they are perks with

the job. I think even the members who buy all high end artisan pipes are interested in the conversation about the rest of the membership. I like the

Kaywoodies with push bits, like the Saxon, without the quirky Drinkless screw-in stems, and regular briar bowls. Good pipes are available at all price

levels.

 

minfarshaw

Member
Aug 12, 2014
279
0
I see that. I may get myself a Brindisi next month. I'm still smoking the same bowl by the way. Ahhhhh. I may have just found the right pipe for this tobacco.
I did listen to that show. My Stanwell brushed black was actually my favorite before I tried my new Pete last night. that show inspired me to try some Proper English. That one is going in my Aerosphere tomorrow. I hope it's yummy.

 

sablebrush52

Preferred Member
Jun 15, 2013
9,705
343
From time to time we post about whether or not one has to spend a lot of moolah to get a great pipe. From a simple performance standpoint, it's simply not true.
But there are good reasons to spend more on a pipe that aren't strictly performance related. Some of them are esthetic, like beautiful grain, staining, or a signature carving style. Some smokers appreciate the comfort of a properly hand carved bit. Others love the sense of connection to history when purchasing a pipe of venerable age from a highly regarded marque. Still others like the "open draw" that many artisan makers use in their engineering. And, better materials can provide a more durable pipe with a longer working life. But none of this means that more costly pipes are necessarily superior performers.
As others have pointed out, your smoking technique may have more of an effect than the pipe itself, provided that the pipe isn't a sour stinker.

 

klause

Preferred Member
Jul 9, 2012
554
0
Min, I have a couple of higher end pipes (yes! They are gorgeous and smoke amazingly well - they should!), and examples of everything else on the descending scale. I love 'em all.
At the moment I am in love with an old Banbury that I bought not so long ago in a flea market for £1. Yep, £1. I wasn't expecting much. However, this is, quite possibly, my finest smoking pipe for flakes. I can count my 'perfect' smokes on the fingers of one hand, but, yesterday, this increased by one. I spent an hour in the greenhouse with that ugly little pipe and some HH Latakia Flake. I ascended to heaven - briefly.
It is quite astonishing to me how some of theses old, and/or cheap, pipes can deliver such beautiful smokes. I have a WW2 era beach wood squat bulldog, with plastic stem that is a superb smoker - that one cost 1 euro.
I tend to gravitate to these pipes more and more - to the point I rarely look at higher end pipes now. I'm looking for those good old, cheap, lumps of smoking perfection few others seem to be interested.
But, as Sablebrush says, technique is the key - I'm still trying to work that out ;-)

 

ststephen

New member
Apr 1, 2013
4
0
Lots of great cheap briars in my collection; I've never spent over $100 for anything, and I'm proud of this. I've been smoking for 19 yrs. now. I was lucky enough however to have worked in a B&M retail tobacco place early on, so my discount would get me about half off. I bought one Peterson and a Comoy there, but mostly I bought no-names/ seconds/basket pipes etc and had great luck on everything except one. I'm also into cobs- the ultimate cheapies- my latest being Tom Sawyer and Pony Express. Great small sizes for flakes/high octane tobacs! I wish there were more briars with smaller bowls, but I guess they don't sell as well.
What did you not like about your lux twist flake, Min?

 

minfarshaw

Member
Aug 12, 2014
279
0
Black billiard. I'm really starting to like billiards. I didn't think I would but they are comfortable for some reason.

 

fnord

Preferred Member
Dec 28, 2011
2,752
0
Topeka, KS
Min:
I've always been a happy camper with used, dead man, eBay pipes. My restoration skills are marginal at best but I can get by with lots of elbow grease and asking questions of our in-house experts. Most of these cats love to share their knowledge and I'll always be grateful to them.
I also learned early on that you'll rarely go wrong buying vintage Jost, Diebel, L.L. Bean & Edward's burners. Many of the Jost pipes were made by Comoy's, Diebel used GBD blanks and Edward's, at one time, cornered the market of vintage Algerian briar before their civil war in the late fifties and early sixties.
Seconds from the great pipe houses are also a great way to fill out a rotation. They won't be the prettiest pigs in the pen, but they'll be damned good smokers if you can live with the rustication, routing and the odd blemish. (I have a list of Seconds I'd be happy to share with you or anybody else.)
Fnord

 

minfarshaw

Member
Aug 12, 2014
279
0
Thanks fonts. A list of seconds would be nice. I have a Savinelli natural that I really like. It's a bulldog that I use for my Latakia blends. It is starting to stink. Maybe it's time to clean it.