Bent Chamber?

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bienden

New member
Jan 5, 2019
11
5
Hanoi, Vietnam
Hello everybody.

I make pipes as an amateur. For me, learning about the different types of wood and the structure of a pipe is an interesting.

I wonder, why do the pipes I see, they all have straight chambers?

In some pipe shapes, carving straight chambers will make the walls too thin. What if the bent chamber? And I tried, for example, this Olivewood pipe.

So, I would like to raise this issue, please tell me: did you see which pipe with the bent chamber? What are the disadvantages for bent chambers?

Thanks.





 

sasquatch

Preferred Member
Jul 16, 2012
978
21
It's rare, and you'd never see it on a production pipe, but yes, sometimes a little banana-hook, done by successively drilling at more of an angle (and maybe a smaller bit) is sometimes helpful.

 

bassbug

Preferred Member
Dec 29, 2016
867
1
All you're going to do is create yet another chamber shape that will ignite yet another long debate on how this one affects smoking qualities and whether its the best pipe for flakes or coins or ribbon cut tobacco...
Have at it, we need more of that :)

 

chasingembers

Preferred Member
Nov 12, 2014
15,927
739
All you're going to do is create yet another chamber shape that will ignite yet another long debate on how this one affects smoking qualities and whether its the best pipe for flakes or coins or ribbon cut tobacco...
That one is best for Kendal Gold Banana.

 

crashthegrey

Preferred Member
Dec 18, 2015
2,810
5
From the consumers perspective, the difficulty in cleaning and reaming is a major issue. From the technical perspective, check in with the pipe makers forum. You will get some incredible answers to these sorts of questions from people who have tried everything.

 

madox07

Preferred Member
Dec 12, 2016
1,421
48
I have a Stanwell Zebrano that has the chamber drilled at a slight angle. I am assuming that this is not a mistake, as they don't mess around with quality over there. Not sure how that impacts the smoke, but the pipe smokes like a charm. Bun banana like in your drawing ... must be a rarity.

 

bienden

New member
Jan 5, 2019
11
5
Hanoi, Vietnam
I have not found this topic, sorry for the late reply.

From the consumers perspective, the difficulty in cleaning and reaming is a major issue.
cleaning and reaming the banana chamber is not too difficult. I still often use 3in1 Brebbia tools for my Bent Chamber Pipe.

However, you need to do a clean up immediately after smoking them.



 

cosmicfolklore

Preferred Member
Aug 9, 2013
18,120
460
Two of my Becker’s have curved chambers. The problem I have is the the curved Danish Scoop pipe. I would never use a reamer anyways. They always seem to be cumbersome and do more damage than good. I do better with a really well sharpened pocketknife, but on the scoop the chamber is shallow and slants more into a hard to reach bottom. So, I leave the cake on the bottom, but in just a few years the cake has elevated the bottom of the bowl up, reducing the amount of tobacco, I can load. My other Becker is just fine and easily reamed with my knife and a gentle touch.

 

mso489

Preferred Member
Feb 21, 2013
26,237
436
To avoid reaming, I'd just scoop out the ash and wipe out the pipe with a paper napkin or paper towel. I do this with my regular pipes, have for decades, and I don't own or need a reamer. My other comment would be, since the ember burns upward, I would expect a more uneven heat on the bowl, and over time that would cause uneven wear. For a pipe smoker with a large stable of pipes, it would never be a problem. For someone with one or a few pipes who smoked a lot, I think it might cause a burnout sooner than an upright pipe which would take a long time. Just speculating; resident physicists may have a different view.

 

anthonyrosenthal74

Preferred Member
Jan 8, 2013
7,302
10
I would think it might just be better to drill a conical chamber, as many dublin-esqe, or freehand pipes have. Easier for the consumer to clean than a curved chamber would be, I think.

 

frozenchurchwarden

Preferred Member
Mar 1, 2014
1,977
28
I'm confident that there would be a market for pipes with curved chambers if someone really wanted to create the pipes, if for no other reason than the novelty of it.

Various Italian carvers gain notoriety for their curved shanks and the resulting shapes, a curved chamber should be received similarly.

 

bienden

New member
Jan 5, 2019
11
5
Hanoi, Vietnam
Through all the comments, I see people only worry about cleaning the pipe problem.

I assumed that I could not see a pipe with a bent chamber because they could make straight chamber a drill easier? So is it more efficient to produce pipes?

To caving the bent chamber, I must first drill a small hole. Then use the round grinding head to create a curve bit by bit. It really takes a lot of effort, but the effect is also worth it?.

 

anthonyrosenthal74

Preferred Member
Jan 8, 2013
7,302
10
I just don't see the point, no offense. I don't see how it would benefit the way the pipes smokes, or how it might improve flavor or anything. Being more difficult to clean properly just adds more negatives than positives.

 

crashthegrey

Preferred Member
Dec 18, 2015
2,810
5
I'm with Anthony. I don't see a problem with it (besides the above mentioned long term cleaning), but I don't know if I see the point either.

 

maxsmoke

Junior Member
Jan 30, 2019
63
0
I have a Hilson Horn pipe and the chamber is slightly angled . I am new to smoking pipes and am in no position to offer an experienced answer, but I believe the reason is with the angle the burn isn’t as even .

 

cosmicfolklore

Preferred Member
Aug 9, 2013
18,120
460
I think Bienden is experimenting. He’s making these for himself, so I encourage it. Play. Maybe you’ll learn something that we don’t see about this. Enjoy yourself.