BBC Documentary: Scotland And The Klan.

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mawnansmiff

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Oct 14, 2015
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Sunny Cornwall, UK.
Shown on the BBC last night was a fascinating documentary about the founding of the KKK by a small group of Scottish settlers. By all accounts it was originally set up as a purely social society with none of the racial hatred that was what eventually to become its raison d'etre.
As a long time student of social history I found the hour long program a real eye opener. For example I never knew segregation in schools only ended in 1954!
If you have Scottish ancestors who settled in the Southern States or are merely interested in what is a fascinating though shameful part of American history then I would highly recommend you watch it. If you can't get BBC tv direct then you could try their catchup service iPlayer...you will not be disappointed!
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b07yjk0j
Fingers crossed the above link will take you directly to the documentary.
Regards,
Jay.

 

davet

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May 9, 2015
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I never knew segregation in schools only ended in 1954!
Still here in New Brunswick Canada. 8O Separate French schools, school districts and buses, can't have those French students "assimilated". Shameful :oops:

 

cosmicfolklore

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Aug 9, 2013
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Yep, I remember when they desegregated my middle school here in Alabama in the late 70's to 80's. Also, slavery did not end in Alabama till after WW1, right here in my little sleepy city of Helena, where forced labor worked the iron and coal mines in the area. They built the new high school on top of the mines and cells used to house the slaves. Lots of pictures in our town museum. They used vagrancy laws to keep the labor pool high. If a black man was stopped on the street anywhere in the state with less than $5 in their pocket, they were sent here to work till death. Pretty severe, especially when $5 back then was like having ten thousand now.

Alabama never suffered any repercussions of the civil war, nor slavery. No one was ever punished. And, actually my grand parents had always said that it was just like General Lee won that war for us. The KKK was just the icing on the cake. Even today, that disgusting organization holds more influence in this area than even most folks here will admit. We have to look at their billboards when we drive through the central areas of the state.
But yes, apparently the KKK was based on ancient Scottish rites.

 

theloniousmonkfish

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Jan 1, 2017
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"I never knew segregation in schools only ended in 1954!"
We still have financial segregation from gerrymandering or "redistricting".

 

cranseiron

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May 17, 2013
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Biloxi, MS
Micheal, I'm next door Mississippi which usually has a worse (THE worst) reputation for racial discord. Last summer I took a motorbike trip through the delta and saw no KKK evidence. I always thought Alabama was a cut above us. Well, maybe-- maybe not....

 

mso489

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Feb 21, 2013
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The KKK is usually associated with the American South, but the state with the largest all-time KKK membership, in the 1920's I think it was, was Indiana, if my civics teacher source is correct.

 

kane

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Dec 2, 2014
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I have heard, but can not confirm, that California has some large KKK chapters or groups, one being in the Modesto area, and one being in the wealthy area of Orange County around New Port Beach.

 

mawnansmiff

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Oct 14, 2015
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Sunny Cornwall, UK.
"There were still schools that were "unofficially" segregated here in Indiana up into the early 70's."
"Also, slavery did not end in Alabama till after WW1."

Wow, those were facts I was not aware of...such is my ignorance of American history.
I can clearly remember when at primary school aged about 7 in a pretty conservative area of Sheffield there was the only little black boy that I had ever seen. His name was Leroy Gale and was a lovely chap. One day whilst playing football in the playground he fell and grazed his knees (we all wore short trousers back then) as one does. Thing is I was surprised to see that his blood was red! I don't know what colour I expected it to be but I somehow didn't expect it to be red :crazy:
Such is the innocence and ignorance of childhood.
Since I have joined this forum I have learned so much about pipes and tobacco, but also through suggestions from forum members have watched the DVD boxed sets of Deadwood and Boardwalk Empire which got me interested into buying my first lot of Bourbon whiskies...all these subjects I have read much about on the web and am slowly picking up on American history. A subject I might add that was only glossed over at my school.
Regards,
Jay.

 

dottiewarden

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Mar 25, 2014
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Toronto
Social integration cannot be legislated. I recently had my application to teach English at a Muslim school rejected based on the fact that I am not Muslim.
Racial and religious communities often choose to separate themselves from the broader community as a way of preserving their values and identities, much like some French Canadians do in Canada. We are mistaken to think that segregation is an ideal sought after by identifiable communities. These communities seek isolation in many instances.

 

cally454

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Dec 31, 2012
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Kane when I lived in SD in the 90's a kid from Santee dropped a tv on a Hispanic kid from a couple stories -killed him. Big white supremacist group in santee/ El Cajon. Had no idea. Neighbor said why do you think your never hassled (I'm white) I told him if it means killing minorities I'd rather take my chances

 

davet

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May 9, 2015
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Racial and religious communities often choose to separate themselves from the broader community as a way of preserving their values and identities, much like some French Canadians do in Canada.
When it is legislated, enacted in law, it's a different bag of cats. I've typed and deleted several times and will just leave it at that and spare all of you my rantings... :mrgreen:

 

unadoptedlamp

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Mar 19, 2014
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Mawnansmif: A People's History of the United States by Howard Zinn is an interesting read about U.S. history.
Davet: I too used to question much of the legislation of French in Canada. I've come to realize that it is to help protect the culture, which in my opinion, is an important thing that is worth protecting. That's when I noticed that my reaction was more of a knee jerk issue of not fully understanding the importance of protecting culture. English is fine and all, but globally, the adoption of English as a primary language is having some very serious consequences for culture. I doubt it will change your perspective of French laws in Canada, but the book Spoken Here by Mark Abley is a fascinating read. It doesn't touch on French, because the focus is on the languages around the world that are on the brink of extinction. And with the language, goes the culture. A real eye opener.
It wasn't until I learned a couple of other languages that it became apparent to me the role language can play in how your thoughts, emotions, experiences are formulated. I think our European friends are at a much bigger advantage, being exposed to so many different languages with relative ease compared to those who grow up in North America.
Frankly, I think that without the French, Canada would be a much more boring place! They're certainly a bit more lively.

 

dottiewarden

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Mar 25, 2014
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Toronto
English is fine and all, but globally, the adoption of English as a primary language is having some very serious consequences for culture.
Despite being an English teacher, I couldn't agree more. Languages are used to express ideas, concepts, and philosophies that often are relevant to specific regions and cultures for natural reasons. I liken the risk to the extinction of languages to the loss of potentially medicinal plants of the great Amazon. We will never know the unique concepts the dying cultures are taking with them, thus culture and language are certainly worth conserving.

 

davet

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May 9, 2015
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I too used to question much of the legislation of French in Canada
I'm talking of New Brunswick, officially bilingual. Separate schools , hospitals and administrations. Students are not allowed to travel on the same school bus, if this means a full size bus is needed to carry two or three kids that's fine. Badly needed Paramedics can't work overtime shifts because they can't speak french. Everthing is duplicated, everything.
Frankly, I think that without the French, Canada would be a much more boring place! They're certainly a bit more lively.
Have you ever been to Newfoundland? 8O Now that's a lively place and people, salt of the earth. They speak English but you may need a translater. The show filmed there about fishing, Salt Water Cowboys, uses subtitles :rofl:

 

theloniousmonkfish

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Jan 1, 2017
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"...thus culture and language are certainly worth conserving."
That's another bag itself. At what point do we put cultures under glass? What if the cultures are choosing to abandon their ways? Are they to remain in their culture through our own wish for the preservation of that culture?

 
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