Anything That Eliminates Odor from Pipes Sitting Out?

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ashdigger

Preferred Member
Jul 30, 2016
5,296
110
I opened this thread thinking I would find sage advice for getting the smoking odor out of my pipes and found out that clushing hot water is the way of the heretics.
Which pipes are we talking about? I usualky use Liquid Plumber.

 

cosmicfolklore

Preferred Member
Aug 9, 2013
18,607
1,476
well, yes, and it was all of those wooden boats absorbing all of that water that made us start using metals for modern boats, right?

Actually, when I started rinsing my pipes, the ones that had swollen stummels that no longer held onto the stems, started once again holding the stems tight.

I have not had any issues at all, but if someone doesn't want to rinse their pipes... very well then, but you may want to reevaluate the logic. Pipes are soaked in water all throughout the pipemaking and finishing phases, so... :puffy:

 
Dec 11, 2018
257
0
and it was all of those wooden boats absorbing all of that water that made us start using metals for modern boats, right?
Ahh, now you're getting into physics! I love physics...actually, old wooden boats did absorb water, but stayed afloat anyway because of their shape and the fact that (most) wood is less dense than water regardless of whether it is water logged or not..eventually it will sink though (just like a log sinks to the bottom of a pond eventually) unless drydocked for a period of time or coated with something.
Anyway, I have before contemplated using water to flush pipes because I know others do as well, and your point about the stem seems reasonable. My real problem is my limited number of pipes...I keep dropping pipes overboard when I'm fishing, hence, I'm just not willing to risk damaging the few I do keep on hand...it's all out of an abundance of caution for me. Plus, a pipe with residue doesn't bother me in the least anyway, I'm not that anal.

 

cosmicfolklore

Preferred Member
Aug 9, 2013
18,607
1,476
When you're ready, you'll be ready. But, the key to the water rinse is that you dry them off really well. I use a papertowel rolled and reamed into the camber. Then a pipecleaner or two, and then maybe a q-tip in the mortise. Wipe it all down really well, and then give the rim a wipe or two on the leather. Voila, like new.
But, really, I have my days where I just run a pipecleaner through them and leave it be. I am not diligent or disciplined enough to do something the exact same way every day.

 

crashthegrey

Preferred Member
Dec 18, 2015
2,848
39
I use a papertowel rolled and reamed into the camber. Then a pipecleaner or two, and then maybe a q-tip in the mortise. Wipe it all down really well, and then give the rim a wipe or two on the leather.
I hope this water method is not meant to be easier. :wink:

 
Dec 11, 2018
257
0
Comsic, and anyone else listening, I know this (and has been for a few posts now) off topic, but, in the recent past I had a pissing match with Smokingpipes because they refused to take back a pipe for a finishing defect simply because I told them I had used a damp cloth to gently wipe the outside of it and the finish came off--they said I should NEVER use ANY liquids "such as water" on the outside of the pipe...given that you and many others rinse their pipes with water and obviously get water on the outside of it that you have to at some point, dry off, don't you think this is bullshit? I do...I mean, I wasn't at all rubbing in any way, just wiping loose dust/dirt etc from the outside of it with a damp microfiber towel...what say you...

 

cosmicfolklore

Preferred Member
Aug 9, 2013
18,607
1,476
Yeh, I have never asked anyone to take a pipe back. I have no advice on that. I maybe would just avoid using a company again that didn't take my word on something. But, like I said, I have no real advice.

 

cosmicfolklore

Preferred Member
Aug 9, 2013
18,607
1,476
Oh come on, Bill. One doesn't have to stand too close to you to smell sense your fear of water. :puffy:

 

judcasper

Senior Member
Jan 9, 2019
306
1
I don't like the stale tobacco smell coming from my pipe and would not hesitate to flush them with water if that's the answer. I'm with Cosmic, in that I can't imagine there'd be any detrimental effect whatsoever.
That said I don't pay a three-figure sum for my pipes.... hell, I don't pay a two-figure sum :D

 

instymp

Preferred Member
Jul 30, 2012
2,039
9
well, yes, and it was all of those wooden boats absorbing all of that water that made us start using metals for modern boats, right?

Actually, when I started rinsing my pipes, the ones that had swollen stummels that no longer held onto the stems, started once again holding the stems tight.

I have not had any issues at all, but if someone doesn't want to rinse their pipes... very well then, but you may want to reevaluate the logic. Pipes are soaked in water all throughout the pipemaking and finishing phases, so... :puffy:
So, the wood swelled?

 

olkofri

Preferred Member
Sep 9, 2017
2,891
1,108
AFAIK, the pipes are not soaked in water. Rather, they're daubed with water or alcohol so that the carver is able to see the grain and thus carve them in the most aesthetically pleasing manner.
Some manufacturers also warn against using water. Here's what MacQueen Pipes says about it: "Try to keep your pipe from getting wet. We use a fine Carnauba wax finish on our pipes so that the wood is not sealed and is able to breath [sic]. This wax can be damaged by water so try and keep it from getting wet." Source: Pipe Care Tips; emphasis mine.

 

chasingembers

Preferred Member
Nov 12, 2014
17,127
3,058
AFAIK, the pipes are not soaked in water. Rather, they're daubed with water or alcohol so that the carver is able to see the grain and thus carve them in the most aesthetically pleasing manner.
This.
My favorite carver would only wipe stummels with a damp cloth as he worked to see what the grain looked like. He only cleans his pipes with pure grain alcohol.

 

jpmcwjr

Preferred Member
May 12, 2015
14,603
2,743
Monterey Peninsula
Really, it's so easy to clean the pipes out every day with a 30 second blast. That should do it. And sometimes add some wet coffee grounds to the just flushed pipe, and let 'em dry for a few days.
Good luck!

 

raevans

Member
Apr 20, 2013
271
5
Just quit bathing for a week or two, leave dirty underwear on the floor, and make sure to leave plenty of whisker stubble and shaving cream in the bathroom sink. Do that and I am willing to bet that the pipe issue will not even come up again. Or you can go the humidor route. It will help cut down on the aroma, but will be a lot less entertaining.