American made pipes

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dkaye201

Member
Jun 13, 2016
183
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Since I've only been a member of this forum since June, this entry may have already been discussed. First, let me say that I love my pipes from other countries. I treasure my Parkers, Nordings, BBBs, my Petersons and others. I always read the entries concerning Italian and English pipes. If one considers MM cobs and other pipes made in America, we may be the largest pipe manufacturers in the world. At the moment, I'm smoking Mississippi River in a very old WDC. I have to wonder why there is no subtopic for American pipes? My personal rotation includes Fischer, Arlington, the above mentioned WDCs and my Parkers, etc.There are so many fine artists making world-class pipes in the US at the moment, I'd love to hear from others what their favorites are. Has an American subtopic ever been discussed, or our thoughts best reserved for the Pipe Talk subtopic? I'd love to read your thoughts on the subject.

 

mso489

Preferred Member
Feb 21, 2013
25,886
63
Lots of conversation about U.S. pipes on Forums, factory and artisanal, not to mention a number of U.S. carvers are Forums members, and isn't there a Kaywoodie collector thread? Anyway, many members are admirers of, and owners of, U.S. pipes. My go-to carver is Jerry Perry, but he's hard to reach, sells only at the N.C. fairgrounds twice a year. I am also a fan of Dr. Grabow, especially Royaltons, made in Sparta, N.C., and I also own Kaywoodie and Yello-Bole. So U.S. made pipes are a constant feature here. You won't have to wait long or look far.

 

aldecaker

Preferred Member
Feb 13, 2015
4,413
3
I am a big fan of Grabows and Missouri Meerschaums. Other than the "Show Off Your _______" threads, I don't think we have anything dedicated to just American products.

 

mso489

Preferred Member
Feb 21, 2013
25,886
63
Forums is a big booster of Missouri Meerschaum cobs, but also admires Old Dominion, the heritage cob pipes with reed stems. No one should go without an Old Dominion or two, or more.

 

aldecaker

Preferred Member
Feb 13, 2015
4,413
3
@MSO- I've looked at those, but they seem a tad small on the ID, and I don't think I would like the round reed stem as opposed to the modern stem "feel".

 

pipestud

Preferred Member
Dec 6, 2012
1,717
2
Robinson, TX.
I run literally thousands of pipes through my eBay site each year and attend 3-4 pipe shows a year. I've also smoked a few pipes (okay, a lot) in my four decades of pipe smoking. It is my personal opinion that the United States has AS MANY outstanding individual pipe makers as any other country in the world. I am speaking in overall general terms as countries like Denmark, England and Italy also have some great individual pipe makers who rank as among the best in the world. BUT, I'd personally put the Americans up there with any country in the world as far as style and smoking quality.

 

alexnc

Preferred Member
Oct 25, 2015
588
3
MSO489 - Jerry Perry? I'm near the NC Fairgrounds! I guess he shows at the state fair? Just missed - when else?

 

mso489

Preferred Member
Feb 21, 2013
25,886
63
alexnc, Jerry Perry sells twice a year, once at the N.C. State Fair in October at the Village of Yesteryear; he's such a regular exhibitor, he's been elected "mayor" of the Village on occasion. In April he exhibits at the TAPS pipe show, also at the Fairgrounds. He works in briar, Mountain Laurel, maple, and cocobolo ... maybe others. I bought my first pipe from him in 2002, a Mountain Laurel, and purchased five or six others over the years since. In some ways, the simplicity of his designs draws from folk art, but he also does interesting work with colors both on briar and on stems, as well as some unusual asymmetrical work both on traditional shapes and in freehands that seems to draw as much from Japanese art as from Danish design. And still it's kind of low key and country. Nothing quite like it. If I'm not buying, I stay away because it's hard to resist.

 

mso489

Preferred Member
Feb 21, 2013
25,886
63
American factory pipes remind me of 1950's American cars, in terms of design. Actually, the pipes are considerably better made. There was a time, with some makes, when the cars were made to rust out and otherwise deteriorate; then the car makers had to try harder as European and Japanese cars became competitive. But in terms of design, the pipes have that endearing separate cultural twang -- appealing, striving, sometimes surprisingly artful. I think the the people at Dr. Grabow really do a subtle job; the shaping on the Royalton bulldog is pretty refined. It's easy to look at the price and sneer, but once you get into the smoking, and handling of the pipes, they're surprisingly well done, in many cases. I still haven't made friends with the concept of Brylon, the synthetic briar replacement; Brylon is still a bridge too far for me. But one member explained how he used Brylon pipes in especially dirty work site situations in fire reclamation projects and really appreciated their durability and the trait of being able to be cleaned of grease, grit, and dust. I have too many pipes to rack a Brylon just as an artifact, but I appreciate the suitability for heavy use.