A Mauser Commercial

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madox07

Preferred Member
Dec 12, 2016
1,394
20
Boy, was pipe smoking popular back in the day, or is the iconic huntsmen a pipe smoker? :puffpipe:


 

mikethompson

Preferred Member
Jun 26, 2016
3,968
82
Paul, I think the ad is for firearms and the pipe is just part of the hunters 'look'.

 

mso489

Preferred Member
Feb 21, 2013
25,923
95
The bowl is too small, and I think that is to de-emphasize the pipe, since it is a firearms ad. My paternal grandpa was a duck hunter and smoked a pipe. When he got too old to hike out, he stayed by the car, and on at least one occasion met the empty handed hunting party beside the car with several nice ducks he'd bagged.

 

alaskanpiper

Preferred Member
May 23, 2019
1,319
88
Alaska
But isn't it also important to not be smelled by your quarry?
This. I bring my pipe moose hunting, but only fire it up in camp at night. Part of the reason I love rope tobaccos. I can chew them in the field, and smoke them at night in camp. That and they are unspillable and can just be wiped off if dropped on the wet muskeg.
I love these old hunting/pipe art posters, don't get me wrong, but since the man is holding an open site rifle (expecting a reasonably close shot at larger game on land) it is decidedly unrealistic that he would be actively smoking in the field if he actually plans on having any hope of harvesting any type of mammal with a nose.
And also, as everyone else has so accurately states, that bowl belongs on a kiseru! The pipes I bring hunting are usually FAT tankards.

 

husky

Member
Jul 1, 2019
140
0
But isn't it also important to not be smelled by your quarry?
Yes but it depends on what type of hunt you are doing.

In Sweden the annual moose hunt is a big thing. Primarily one takes a position

at a known game path and wait for a moose to come by.

It is not uncommon for a person to have the same post every year so they bring out firewood

in advance and have a nice little campfire, boil some coffee and generally relax.

For many people that is the main thing of moose hunting. Getting a few days on your own,

sitting in nature and contemplate life. Like a week long bowl of tobacco...
Alaskanpiper, I have that exact rifle, mauser 98 with open sights in 9,3x57!

The main scandinavian moose and bear rifle from the fifties.

 

paulie66scandinavian

Preferred Member
Jul 28, 2016
3,243
29
Finland-Scandinavia-EU
@Husky, I know that Swedish Mauser,they manufactured this 98 in both countries Deustchland&Sweden whereas here(Finland)back in the days our Army issue was modified Mozhin & Nagan carabine 7,62 Russian mod.If You ask me I do like better this very Mauser

 

jaytex969

Preferred Member
Jun 6, 2017
4,193
190
I have the Finnish M39 Mosin variant and several Mausers.
Don't underestimate the Finnish Mosin. The Finns refined the clunky Russian Mosins into very competent weapons.
I'd be hard pressed to choose between the two for accuracy and reliability.
Now, my Swiss K-31 would leave them all behind...
You think you have enough guns.

Then, the zombies come...



 

alaskanpiper

Preferred Member
May 23, 2019
1,319
88
Alaska
In Sweden the annual moose hunt is a big thing. Primarily one takes a position

at a known game path and wait for a moose to come by.
Moose here will sometimes stay in the same place for days on end. We tend to hunt them by going to known "bedding" locations and calling them out. We will try 3 or 4 locations per day until we get a response. Because we are often communicating with them, we try to avoid all scent whatsoever. If that bull has cows with him, and they catch one tiny hint that you may not actually be a moose, they will spook instantly and take the bulls with them. Sometimes all it takes for this to happen is the slightest breeze in the wrong direction, and you will never even know they were there. It still amazes me how a 1200 pound animal with 65 inch wide antlers can sprint through thick brush without making a sound.
I can't go 5 feet in that stuff without making a racket.
Aside from some parts of Canada, Sweden is the only place I've seen where the moose hunting culture seems to be as strong and avid as it is here in Alaska. All life revolves around it for a month. Although most of the pictures of moose I see from Sweden they look like much smaller bodied animals than the moose we take here. Not a lot of huge racks there, either eh?
Alaskanpiper, I have that exact rifle, mauser 98 with open sights in 9,3x57!

The main scandinavian moose and bear rifle from the fifties.
That's awesome! I've got some pretty old stuff, mostly rugers and winchesters. I hunt now with a .300 win mag that was my father's gun, before that I used my grandfather's .30-06 from the 1940s. It has an awesome scope mount that allows you to site through the mounts to use the open sites if you are at close range. I love that old gun, but it proved a little light for a certain bear encounter. A man can only buy so many pairs of pants...

 

husky

Member
Jul 1, 2019
140
0
Moose in Sweden is a bit of a story.

Yes we have a smaller subspecies than your alaskan moose and also a warmer climate resulting in smaller body size.

In the beginning of the last century moose were very scarce, almost hunted to extinction by subsistence farmers.

Some old people still remember when they were kids and someone in the parish had seen a moose track.

It was a big event and everyone with a gun tried to get it. Old remington 1858 rolling blocks and later 1896 mausers

were the common mans gun. With regulation of hunting many species started to recover.

During the fifties we had a change of forestry practice on a national scale.

The forests had been thinned into unproductive wastelands so all was clear cut and replanted.

This resulted in the young stands becoming an unlimited source of food for moose and the population exploded.

During the 80-ies we culled 120.000 moose annually and the beginning of the moose season became the largest homecoming event of the year. Sweden constitutes 2% of the global moose habitat but 50% of all moose killed during hunting are killed in Sweden.

Now, apart from the moose being the most hunted game and an iconic national symbol it is also a traffic hazard and a major problem for forestry as the stands have now matured and there is only a fraction of the previous food available.

The cull, as it is rather than hunt, keeps the population roughly in balance with forrest damage and risk of starvation.

It is much more desirable to shoot a large male than a small one or a female. This has resulted in a skewed male/female ratio

as well as genetic depletion of large individuals.

A common method of hunting is to use one or two dogs. They do not drive the moose but, rather like sheep dogs, try to get the moose to stand still so the dog handler can sneak up close enough to take a shot. If the dogs are not able to get the moose to stand or the dog handler spooks the animal it will move away from the disturbance. This is when most are shot by the previously mentioned posted hunters. Also, in the south were land plots are too small for using dogs, driven hunts are common. By law you are required to have a trained search dog available so almost no wounded animals are lost and all meat is consumed.

 

alaskanpiper

Preferred Member
May 23, 2019
1,319
88
Alaska
an iconic national symbol it is also a traffic hazard
Can definitely relate to this. In Alaska hundreds and hundreds of moose are killed on the roads each year, as well as many people who collide with them (they tend to roll up and come right through the windshield). You can actually get on a list here to receive road killed moose meat.
Sounds like quite the moose history in Sweden. We require a little bit of game management here, but most of it comes in the form of predator control (killing enough bear and wolf to keep moose populations healthy).
It is not legal to kill cow moose here, except for the occasional "draw" hunt for which you must win a lottery. With regular tags (free for anyone) only bulls are harvested, and in most units they must have either 3 brow tines on at least one side OR a 50 inch spread OR be a small "spike/fork" with two or less tines on at least one side.



 

taildraggin

Junior Member
May 25, 2019
62
0
A buddy has an old hunting cabin on a lake in Maine. They’re so far in the grey woods and swamps that there are very few deer, but many moose and bear. (The deer are in town, feeding on hydrangea.) Since, it’s hard to draw a moose or bear tag we go out on what are more ‘armed hiking’ excursions than true deer hunting.
In around 50 years and not for trying, he has shot 1 deer there. That situation was much like our friend here, sitting and smoking. He sat down at a fireroad crossroad and pulled a cig. Puffing away, his Monarch of the North popped out and was dropped. That was 20 years ago. So much for tales rivaling Percival, Selby or Ruark. I go up there for the ruffs and to smoke, drink scotch, Laugh & Scratch, and fire up the old iron cooker.
Of course, it is possible to be chased by a moose (that you can’t shoot) because your buddy has soaked himself in “Doe in Raging Estrous”.

Friend likes custom rifles and Cabala gadgets and had the scent on and a brand new expensive designer make that weighs less than it should and has the power of a german 88. Walking back to the cabin on the 2 track, Bullwinkle pops out behind us In Love, hearts circling his head and blind as a bat. We looked at each other, spent 1/4 sec considering “fight or flight” and the moose stomped. We ran.
We found that swamp donkeys are a lot faster and more determined than many may believe. After a few steps, coincident but independent decisions were made to chuck our rifles in order to increase our velocity. Running downhill into the cabin, we slammed the door just before Bullwinkle backpedaled into the cabin wall outside with a big thump and long skid marks... Can’t remember a time I’ve laughed harder.

 

alaskanpiper

Preferred Member
May 23, 2019
1,319
88
Alaska
Hahaha, yes Bull moose can be a bit aggressive during the rut. Especially small ones who have had their asses kicked a few times by larger bulls. They don't like that you are not the cow you claimed to be while calling, and will often circle you, grunt, and sometimes mock charge. It is always a sphincter tightening experience.
Of course, if they are legal, this is not a problem. You just shoot them in the brains. If they are not......it can get......fun...
You get to weigh the $10K in fines and hunting license revocation against, well, your life and/or limbs. Nothing like having to choose between two shit options. Fortunately, I've never had to do it, usually they will piss off eventually.
I've found whistling at them will sometimes get them to piss off. They don't like it for some reason. If that doesn't work a good old fashioned shot over the bow will usually do it, but that spooks every moose for miles, and will require you to relocate.

 

jaytex969

Preferred Member
Jun 6, 2017
4,193
190
Yes we have a smaller subspecies than your Alaskan moose and also a warmer climate resulting in smaller body size.
That's the reaction I had upon moving to Texas. Growing up in the mid-Atlantic area, when I saw Texas wildlife, my first thought was, "It's like a deer, only smaller."
I've never seen a moose in the wild but met some elk hiking in New Mexico. The leg of a small one was more meat than a whole white tail. I'd have to buy two freezers and get help from all my friends to harvest a moose or elk.


 

5star

Senior Member
Nov 17, 2017
404
0
Looks like my great uncle’s Mauser, the one he used to get a terrific elk one year.