1858 New Army

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jchaplick

Preferred Member
May 8, 2011
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I am am thinking about getting a reproduction New Army made by Pietta. Probably going to keep it in the black powder format for a while, maybe change it to 45 long colt later. I just wanted to see if anyone had any experience with one of these. I am most interested in its accuracy if anyone knows.
I really love this gun and I think it is such a cool piece.


 

jaysin

Preferred Member
Feb 8, 2012
1,083
0
Indiana
I would be afraid to convert it unless your useing black powder or Pyrodex loads modren smokeless would have too high of a cup presure. the metal used in blackpowderguns are not as strong as todays +p and standar smokeless powder gun metal.

 

nsfisher

Preferred Member
Nov 26, 2011
3,567
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Nova Scotia, Canada
In the latter part of the 1800's, many Westerners converted their cap and balls to cartridges. I have been looking for a cartridge, 22 cal. dbbl barrel Derringer for a long time. Can't find one anywhere.

 

standardgewehr

Junior Member
Feb 2, 2011
93
0
Those are fine and with a conversion cylinder kit will be good in .45 Colt.
If you like that format, it's worth the extra bucks to get a Ruger Old Army if you can find one. I love mine.

 

jchaplick

Preferred Member
May 8, 2011
1,701
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t's worth the extra bucks to get a Ruger Old Army if you can find one. I love mine.
I love the ruger, I just want a new army as well.
I would be afraid to convert it unless your useing black powder or Pyrodex loads modren smokeless would have too high of a cup presure. the metal used in blackpowderguns are not as strong as todays +p and standar smokeless powder gun metal.
Well for one, they use modern metallurgy in the reproduction blackpowder pistols, and two you just use cowboy rounds, they use smokeless powder, but they only have a pinch in, instead of the whole case filled. It is really just for convenience.

 

bentmike

Preferred Member
Jan 25, 2012
2,423
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Sure is alot of gunslingers in this group! I can't offer you much opinion on the Pietta 1858. I do have a couple of the Pietta 1858 pockets though. .31 cal, Sweet little boot guns but I never shot 'em.


I have shot this one though. And I see you guys have already been discussing this fine six-shooter. The Old Army has the Blackhawk single action. Smooth as silk and damn accurate too.


I'd say get the Pietta. I've wanted one for years. and I think they even have a target model with better sights. Cap and ball is a hoot!

 

billinsfl

Member
Nov 28, 2010
210
0
The Pietta should suit you. They are as good as any other BP pistol out there today. A conversion cylinder in 45 Colt makes it more versatile. Might want to invest in a proper trigger job and some corn meal if you want to target shoot with it. Let us know how it goes!

 

jchaplick

Preferred Member
May 8, 2011
1,701
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Ah ok, I only really load shotgun shells so that shouldnt be a problem for me

 

maduroman

Preferred Member
May 15, 2010
662
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i hope you are not reloading shot shells in your house. if you do you will wind up with lead dust in the vent system that will be imposible to clean making the house imposible to sell...

 

jchaplick

Preferred Member
May 8, 2011
1,701
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i hope you are not reloading shot shells in your house. if you do you will wind up with lead dust in the vent system that will be imposible to clean making the house imposible to sell...
Nope, the loader is in my grandparents garage.
Des anyone have any exoerience with R and D conversion cylinders?

 

htmn246

Member
Nov 11, 2010
239
0
Nice Remington copy. I prefer the Colt 1860 Army copy myself or the 1851 Navy model.

 

juvat270

Preferred Member
Aug 1, 2011
558
0
Corn Meal?
When loading black powder, there can't be any air gap between the bullet and the powder. With a percussion cap revolver it isn't much of an issue since the lead ball or conical bullet is seated against the powder with the loading lever. However, when loading brass cased cartridges such as the .45 Colt with black powder there is often a gap between the powder level and the bullet. To remedy that, corn meal is often used as a "filler" to fill that gap thus making the cartridges safe to fire. This only applies to rounds loaded with black powder. Smokeless powder does not require the gap to be filled.

 

juvat270

Preferred Member
Aug 1, 2011
558
0
i hope you are not reloading shot shells in your house. if you do you will wind up with lead dust in the vent system that will be imposible to clean making the house imposible to sell...
Unless your casting lead shot or bullets in an unventilated area of the house, its a non-issue. Just the act of reloading cartridges or shot shells isn't going to contaminate your house making it impossible to sell.