The Smug Alert
    January 2nd, 2011

By C. R. S. Lyles
There’s a smug alert in your neck of the woods
.

It comes without mercy, and it comes without warrant. It can’t be reasoned with, negotiated, or swayed from its single-minded purpose to take from you what defines you as an American citizen: Choice.

Melodramatics aside, the singular focus of the health care crusaders parallels perfectly with the lampooning nature of the television show South Park, and more specifically one episode in which the writers address the issue of hybrid car drivers. Now, the nature of the episode leans toward the outlandishly excessive, but the message is clear: while the intent of the self-satisfied is noble, the means through which they seek to achieve their goals inevitably does more harm than good.

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By C. R. S. Lyles
Let’s face it: smoking is not collectively "in vogue" anymore.

Yet the irony of the fact is that the matchslingers of this world, who often find themselves wanting for the support of the American people (and more importantly, the American lawmakers), are the biggest contributors to the American way of life.

How is this possible? you may ask. Certainly they are not contributing to the collective health of the nation, because, let’s face it, the effects of smoking cigarettes are detrimental to one’s health, and the general consensus of the country is that the other tobacco products have adverse effects as well.

But the health issues are beside the point, because, honestly, more money is being funneled into research on how to cure obesity (which is actually pretty ironic that we as a society have to conduct research on how to be less fat) than is being used to fund anti-smoking campaigns or organizations whose mission is to treat people suffering from its more negative effects.

The point of the matter is that the smokers who have to stand out in the cold to light up like a miniature club of social pariahs are the very people who are backing the American dream.

Here’s why.

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